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dc.contributor.advisorStevens, Kate
dc.contributor.authorParker, Holly Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-21T22:50:29Z
dc.date.available2022-11-21T22:50:29Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/15352
dc.description.abstractIn the nineteenth century, bees were used as biological agents in the transformation of the Aotearoa New Zealand landscape by European settler colonists. This transformation adhered to visions that fit British religious, economic, and imperial ideals. These idealised attitudes were communicated through the development of narratives; about landscape, religion, bees, and of Europeans themselves. These idealised narratives served as a nexus of guiding ideologies. While bumblebees were physical instruments in the transformation of the landscape, honeybees served to reinforce both religious and industrial ideals. A variety of threads weave together to create this web of European ideologies, including gender, religion, and economics – all of which can be examined through the lens of bees. Ultimately, this thesis analyses the environmental transformation of the Aotearoa New Zealand landscape in the nineteenth century, specifically between 1839 and 1900, using bees as a cultural framework and tool to do so.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Waikato
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjecthoney
dc.subjecthoneybee
dc.subjectbee
dc.subjectbumblebee
dc.subjectenvironment
dc.subjectlandscape
dc.subjectgrass
dc.subjectclover
dc.subjectnineteenth century
dc.subjectgender
dc.subjectreligion
dc.subjectideology
dc.subjecttransformation
dc.subjectmissionary
dc.subjectwomen
dc.subjectacclimatisation
dc.subjectinsect
dc.subjectintroductions
dc.subjectpollination
dc.subjectscience
dc.subjectagriculture
dc.titleHoney and humble: Bee introductions, environment, and ideology in Aotearoa New Zealand, 1839-1900
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Waikato
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (MA)
dc.date.updated2022-11-18T02:00:36Z
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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