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dc.contributor.authorKarapu, Rolinda
dc.contributor.authorHaimona, Mark
dc.contributor.authorTakurua, Nātana
dc.coverage.spatialConference held at Hamilton, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2008-12-08T03:59:58Z
dc.date.available2008-12-08T03:59:58Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationKarapu, R., Haimona, M. & Takurua, N. (2008). DrownBaseTM – Identifying at risk factors: Strategies and issues around Māori practices and activities towards water safety. In Levy, M., Nikora, L.W., Masters-Awatere, B., Rua, M. & Waitoki, W. (Eds). Claiming Spaces: Proceedings of the 2007 National Maori and Pacific Psychologies Symposium 23rd-24th November 2007 (pp. 132-140). Hamilton, New Zealand: Māori and Psychology Research Unit, University of Waikato.en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978‐0‐473‐13577‐5
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/1557
dc.description.abstractAotearoa has some of the most extensive and beautiful waterways in the world. The seas, rivers, beaches, and lakes provide endless opportunities for Māori to enjoy water activities, such as gathering kai, swimming, hoe waka, diving and fishing (Haimona & Takurua, 2003). For Māori, water is one of the greatest taonga (treasures) of this land – both physically and spiritually. Māori have always been acknowledged as possessing expertise in swimming and aquatic activities pre-European times (Haimona & Takurua, 2003). Early writers such as Best (1976) wrote extensively about Māori games and pastimes while in, on or near the water. These early descriptions illustrate the practice that Māori children were taught to swim at a very early age. The gathering of seafood and the consistent use of waterways as a mode of transport were also customary activities for Māori. The traditional beliefs and practices of Māori, demonstrate a great awareness and understanding of water, its dangers and its life-giving properties.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherMaori and Psychology Research Unit, University of Waikatoen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Maori and Psychology Research Unit, University of Waikato 2008 Each contributor has permitted the Maori and Psychology Research Unit to publish their work in this collection. No part of the material protected in this copyright notice may be reproduced or utilised in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without the written permission of the contributor concerned.en_US
dc.subjectMaorien_US
dc.subjectPacificen_US
dc.subjectpsychologyen_US
dc.subjectwater safetyen_US
dc.titleDrownBaseTM – Identifying at risk factors: Strategies and issues around Māori practices and activities towards water safetyen_US
dc.typeConference Contributionen_US
dc.relation.isPartOfProceedings of the 2007 National Māori and Pacific Psychologies Symposiumen_NZ
pubs.begin-page132en_NZ
pubs.elements-id18400
pubs.end-page140en_NZ
pubs.finish-date2008-11-24en_NZ
pubs.start-date2008-11-23en_NZ


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