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dc.contributor.authorGomarasca, Ulisseen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMigliavacca, Mircoen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorKattge, Jensen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Jacob A.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorNiinemets, Üloen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWirth, Cen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCescatti, Aen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBahn, Men_NZ
dc.contributor.authorNair, Ren_NZ
dc.contributor.authorAcosta, ATRen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorArain, MAen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBeloiu, Men_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBlack, TAen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBruun, HHen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBucher, SFen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBuchmann, Nen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorByun, Cen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCarrara, Aen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorConte, Aen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorda Silva, ACen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorDuveiller, Gen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorFares, Sen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorIbrom, Aen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorKnohl, Aen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorKomac, Ben_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLimousin, J-Men_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLusk, Christopher H.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMahecha, MDen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMartini, Den_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMinden, Ven_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMontagnani, Len_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMori, ASen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorOnoda, Yen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorPeñuelas, Jen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorPerez-Priego, Oen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorPoschlod, Pen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorPowell, TLen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorReich, PBen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorŠigut, Len_NZ
dc.contributor.authorvan Bodegom, PMen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWalther, Sen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWohlfahrt, Gen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWright, IJen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorReichstein, Men_NZ
dc.coverage.spatialEnglanden_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2023-11-17T02:04:48Z
dc.date.available2023-11-17T02:04:48Z
dc.date.issued2023-07-04en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/16163
dc.description.abstractFundamental axes of variation in plant traits result from trade-offs between costs and benefits of resource-use strategies at the leaf scale. However, it is unclear whether similar trade-offs propagate to the ecosystem level. Here, we test whether trait correlation patterns predicted by three well-known leaf- and plant-level coordination theories - the leaf economics spectrum, the global spectrum of plant form and function, and the least-cost hypothesis - are also observed between community mean traits and ecosystem processes. We combined ecosystem functional properties from FLUXNET sites, vegetation properties, and community mean plant traits into three corresponding principal component analyses. We find that the leaf economics spectrum (90 sites), the global spectrum of plant form and function (89 sites), and the least-cost hypothesis (82 sites) all propagate at the ecosystem level. However, we also find evidence of additional scale-emergent properties. Evaluating the coordination of ecosystem functional properties may aid the development of more realistic global dynamic vegetation models with critical empirical data, reducing the uncertainty of climate change projections.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_NZ
dc.publisherNature Research
dc.rights© 2023. This work is licensed under a CC BY 4.0 licence.
dc.subjectEcosystemen_NZ
dc.subjectPlantsen_NZ
dc.subjectClimate Changeen_NZ
dc.subjectPlant Leavesen_NZ
dc.subjectPhenotypeen_NZ
dc.titleLeaf-level coordination principles propagate to the ecosystem scale.en_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41467-023-39572-5en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfNat Communen_NZ
pubs.begin-page3948
pubs.elements-id323385
pubs.issue1en_NZ
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_NZ
pubs.volume14en_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn2041-1723en_NZ


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