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dc.contributor.authorZorn, Theodore E.
dc.contributor.authorRoper, Juliet
dc.contributor.authorBroadfoot, Kirsten J.
dc.contributor.authorWeaver, C. Kay
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-27T21:03:26Z
dc.date.available2009-01-27T21:03:26Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationZorn, T., Roper, J., Broadfoot, K. & Weaver, C. K. (2006). Focus groups as sites of influential interaction: Building communicative self-efficacy and effecting attitudinal change in discussing controversial topics. Journal of Applied Communication Research, 34(2), 115-140.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/1863
dc.description.abstractAlthough most focus group theorists consider interaction to be a defining feature of focus groups, the influence that occurs through this interaction has been under-theorized. We argue that two important forms of influence may occur: influence on people's beliefs about the substantive issues under discussion and influence on self-efficacy beliefs. As a result of such influence, focus groups provide a learning context that may facilitate empowerment of participants through the development of communicative self-efficacy as they struggle over constructing and sharing understandings of controversial issues. As part of a larger research project on dialogues about science, we present a case study that puts qualitatively analyzed transcripts of interaction and quantitative self-report measures into empirical conversation. The case study demonstrated that focus group participants were influenced in two important ways: participation and interaction led to increased participant confidence and motivation towards participating in public dialogues and to the construction, modification, and contestation of attitudes toward science, scientists, and biotechnology. Findings suggest that scholars should rethink their rationales for and use of the focus group as just a method of data collection and reconsider and explore alternative ways of presenting focus group results.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~content=a743890191~db=all~order=pageen
dc.subjectfocus groupsen
dc.subjectself efficacyen
dc.subjectgroup processen
dc.subjectinfluenceen
dc.subjectscience communicationen
dc.titleFocus groups as sites of influential interaction: Building communicative self-efficacy and effecting attitudinal change in discussing controversial topicsen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00909880600573965en
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of Applied Communication Researchen_NZ
pubs.begin-page115en_NZ
pubs.elements-id31654
pubs.end-page140en_NZ
pubs.issue2en_NZ
pubs.volume34en_NZ


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