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dc.contributor.authorMolan, Peter C.
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-18T01:07:26Z
dc.date.available2009-02-18T01:07:26Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationMolan, P, C. (2008). Current honey research at the University of Waikato. The New Zealand Bee Keeper,16(7), 20-21.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/2028
dc.description.abstractTo put what has become a very large part of our research into context, I briefly outline the history of the chance finding by a PhD student at the University of Dresden in 2005 that few samples of manuka honey examined in a survey of foodstuffs contained an exceptionally high level of MGO, which lead to the proposal in 2006 that MGO, is the antibacterial component of manuka honey. It was the bringing of this to the attention of the world by Manuka Health in July 2007 that led to six of our research group having to work very hard for the past year on gaining an understanding of how MGO forms in manuka honey, seeking scientific substance can be safely consumed when it is in manuka honey, and that when in contact with wound tissues at the high levels at which it occurs in undiluted honey, it does not interfere with the healing process.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSouth City Printen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.nba.org.nz/node/7en
dc.rightsThis article is published in the journal: The New Zealand BeeKeeper. Used with permission.en
dc.subjectbiologyen
dc.subjectmanuka honeyen
dc.subjectMGOen
dc.titleCurrent honey research at the University of Waikatoen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.relation.isPartOfThe New Zealand BeeKeeperen_NZ
pubs.begin-page20en_NZ
pubs.elements-id33133
pubs.end-page21en_NZ
pubs.issue7en_NZ
pubs.volume16en_NZ


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