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dc.contributor.authorHoeberechts, Veronica Anneen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-19T10:14:40Z
dc.date.available2007-08-03T14:03:57Z
dc.date.issued2006en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationHoeberechts, V. A. (2006). Oil Spills in New Zealand’s Territorial Waters: Fence at the Top of the Cliff? (Thesis, Master of Social Sciences (MSocSc)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/2406en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/2406
dc.description.abstractOver the last four decades, there have been many catastrophic oil spills in the marine environment and these larger oil spills have often caused environmental devastation especially if they occurred in the coastal marine area. Serious ecological damage can also be caused from operational discharges, ballast and bilge water, from ships within territorial waters. Until now New Zealand has only had relatively minor oil spillages in its coastal waters, primarily from ships' discharge or accidental leaks in port. The possibility however of a major oil spill occurring within our coastal area is considerably higher today than 20 years ago as there has been a significant increase of all types of oil tankers/bulk carriers/container ships to New Zealand. New Zealand is an island nation that relies heavily on the marine environment for commercial operations such as fisheries and tourism and many New Zealanders enjoy recreational, aesthetic and spiritual ties to the coastal marine area. The sustainability of our territorial sea is therefore of paramount importance. A major oil spill could cause widespread ecological damage, cripple or destroy marine/tourism operations and ensure that the human values associated with the coast are lost, possibly for many years. The research reported here addresses the issue of oil spill preparedness and response in New Zealand's waters. A combination of a review of New Zealand's international commitments and domestic legislation and two case studies of high profile oil spills: the Poor Knights Islands Marine Reserve and the Jody F Millennium are used. The research identifies whether the present environmental legislation, that promotes sustainable management, is proactive in the prevention of a major oil spill and concludes that the New Zealand approach reflects a relatively strong Sustainable Imperative position rather than one of Sustainable Development. In implementation it relies heavily on co-management integrated at the regional council level.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Waikatoen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectOil Spillsen_NZ
dc.subjectCoastal Marine Environmenten_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectInternational MEA's and National Legislationen_NZ
dc.titleOil Spills in New Zealand's Territorial Waters: Fence at the Top of the Cliff?en_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography, Tourism and Environmental Planningen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Waikatoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Social Sciences (MSocSc)en_NZ
uow.date.accession2006-09-19T10:14:40Zen_NZ
uow.date.available2007-08-03T14:03:57Zen_NZ
uow.identifier.adthttp://adt.waikato.ac.nz/public/adt-uow20060919.101440en_NZ
uow.date.migrated2009-06-09T23:34:29Zen_NZ
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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