Show simple item record  

dc.contributor.authorHoult, Adrienneen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2007-02-28T16:00:57Z
dc.date.available2007-08-03T14:23:09Z
dc.date.issued2007en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationHoult, A. (2007). Institutional responses to mental deficiency in New Zealand, 1911-1935: Tokanui Mental Hospital (Thesis, Master of Arts (MA)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/2412en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/2412
dc.description.abstractThis thesis considers the response of one New Zealand institution, Tokanui Mental Hospital, to legislation and policies for 'mental deficiency' introduced during the first half of the twentieth century. Institutional reactions to these policies have been under examined in New Zealand. While psychiatric or mentally ill patients have been the subject of a number of New Zealand histories of the asylum, 'mental defectives' have often been overlooked. Yet during the early-twentieth century, 'mental defectives' were thought to be a source of a number of social problems, and the New Zealand government considered a range of measures aimed at limiting the spread and effect of mental deficiency in society. Policies for 'mental deficiency' were influenced by contemporary anxieties about crime, sexuality and hereditarism. As a policy of segregation was formally prescribed, more 'mental defectives' were committed to mental hospitals and other institutions than ever before. An understanding of the responses to this perceived problem also provides an insight into wider social policies in New Zealand in the first half of the twentieth century. This thesis argues that gender was a significant factor in the decision to commit mental defectives to Tokanui. Subsequent categorisation and treatment within Tokanui was also affected by gender. Official reports inform us about the policies that were in place, and historical materials from Tokanui show how these worked in practice. Most of the archives of Tokanui Mental Hospital have been unexamined by historians before now, and close analysis of patient cases also reveals more about institutional practices. The connection between Tokanui and neighbouring Waikeria Prison is also explored, in the context of contemporary fears surrounding mental deficiency and crime.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Waikatoen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectmental deficiencyen_NZ
dc.subjectTokanuien_NZ
dc.titleInstitutional responses to mental deficiency in New Zealand, 1911-1935: Tokanui Mental Hospitalen_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Waikatoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (MA)en_NZ
uow.date.accession2007-02-28T16:00:57Zen_NZ
uow.date.available2007-08-03T14:23:09Zen_NZ
uow.identifier.adthttp://adt.waikato.ac.nz/public/adt-uow20070228.160057en_NZ
uow.date.migrated2009-06-09T23:30:41Zen_NZ
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record