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dc.contributor.authorZahra, Anne Louiseen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2006-12-20T16:21:41Z
dc.date.available2007-01-22T12:03:19Z
dc.date.issued2006en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationZahra, A. L. (2006). Regional Tourism Organisations in New Zealand from 1980 to 2005: Process of Transition and Change (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/2554en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/2554
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is a historical case study tracing the establishment and evolution of Regional Tourism Organisations (RTOs) in New Zealand. It describes their role, structure and functions and the political processes that have influenced how they have operated and changed from 1980 to 2005. RTOs are examined in the context of government policies, local and national politics and tourism private and public sector relationships. RTOs were central to many of the key recommendations of the New Zealand Tourism Strategy 2010 (NZTS 2010) released in 2001. The NZTS 2010 attempted to address a range of tourism policy gaps created by a policy vacuum in the 1990s whereby the public and private tourism sectors focused mainly on international marketing. This strategy shaped government policy during this decade. The research findings show that although public and private sector institutional arrangements impacting on RTOs have changed, there remains, as in the past, no uniformity in their role, structure, functions and their future financial and political viability remains insecure. The NZTS 2010 raised destination management and its alignment with destination marketing as a major policy issue that needed to be addressed in the decade leading up to 2010 with RTOs having a pivotal role. A generic regional destination management model is presented. Structures and processes incorporated into this model include: a national destination management tourism policy; support for tourism by local government at the national level; a well defined destination management team; community collaboration; and tourism being integrated into the wider planning processes of local government. The model identified requisite building blocks to support regional destination management such as: the provision of staff and financial resources for regional tourism; the building of a high tourism profile in the community; the availability of statistics and research data at the regional level; local government planners acknowledging the impacts of tourism; and the existence of a legal mandate for tourism at the regional and/or local government level. When applying this model to the New Zealand context, it was found that a number of the structures and processes required for effective regional destination management were lacking, such as regional statistics and research data, staffing and financial resources for both RTOs and local government, the ability of council planners to understand and integrate tourism into the wider planning processes and a legislative mandate for tourism. The thesis concluded that a vacuum remains in the alignment of destination marketing and management. The historical and political processes of RTO change were also examined in the context of chaos and complexity theory. Chaos and complexity theory provided a complementary and different means to view change. This thesis also presented the opportunity to reflect upon the research process which led to the adoption of a multi-paradigmatic and bricoleur research methodology. Further reflexivity and reflection towards the end of the research process articulated ontological and epistemological philosophical investigations that underlay the multi-paradigmatic approach. A model is presented emphasising that a multi-paradigmatic research approach rests on ultimate reality (metaphysics) which informs the ontology. The model then highlights that ontology precedes and directs epistemology and that both inform the multi-paradigmatic research framework.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Waikatoen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectRegional Tourism Organisationsen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjecttourism policyen_NZ
dc.subjectdestination managementen_NZ
dc.subjectdestination marketingen_NZ
dc.subjectlocal governmenten_NZ
dc.subjectpoliticsen_NZ
dc.subjecthistoryen_NZ
dc.subjectmulti-paradigmaticen_NZ
dc.subjectchaos and complexty theory. ontologyen_NZ
dc.subjectepistemologyen_NZ
dc.titleRegional Tourism Organisations in New Zealand from 1980 to 2005: Process of Transition and Changeen_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineTourism and Hospitalityen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Waikatoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_NZ
uow.date.accession2006-12-20T16:21:41Zen_NZ
uow.date.available2007-01-22T12:03:19Zen_NZ
uow.identifier.adthttp://adt.waikato.ac.nz/public/adt-uow20061220.162141en_NZ
uow.date.migrated2009-06-12T04:52:05Zen_NZ
pubs.elements-id55678
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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