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dc.contributor.authorLegg, Catherine
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-25T23:47:40Z
dc.date.available2009-08-25T23:47:40Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationLegg, C. (2006). Review of Anne Freadman. The machinery of talk: Charles Peirce and the sign hypothesis. Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 84(4), 642-645.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/2873
dc.description.abstractBook Review: This book, officially a contribution to the subject area of Charles Peirce’s semiotics, deserves a wider readership, including philosophers. Its subject matter is what might be termed the great question of how signification is brought about (what Peirce called the ‘riddle of the Sphinx’, who in Emerson’s poem famously asked, ‘Who taught thee me to name?’), and also Peirce’s answer to the question (what Peirce himself called his ‘guess at the riddle’, and Freadman calls his ‘sign hypothesis’).en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urihttp://pdfserve.informaworld.com/414554_751316537_762358604.pdfen
dc.rightsThis is an author's accepted version of an article published in the Australasian Journal of Philosophy. ©2006 Australasian Association of Philosophy.en
dc.subjectphilosophyen
dc.subjectPeirce
dc.subjectsemiotics
dc.subjectgenre
dc.subjectreference
dc.subjectindexicality
dc.subjecticonicity
dc.subjectcategories
dc.subjectinterpretant
dc.titleReview of Anne Freadman. The machinery of talk: Charles Peirce and the sign hypothesisen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00048400601079227en


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