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dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Lucy
dc.coverage.spatialConference held at Hamilton, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-01T19:46:46Z
dc.date.available2009-10-01T19:46:46Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.citationCampbell, L. (2005). How reflective exchanges of second language students can have an impact on their learning outcomes and on future curriculum planning in a tertiary environment. In S. May, M. Franken & R. Barnard (Eds.). LED 2003: 1st International Conference on Language, Education and Diversity, Refereed Conference Proceedings and Keynotes, The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand, 26-29 November 2003 [CD-ROM]. Hamilton, New Zealand: Wilf Malcolm Institute of Educational Research, The University of Waikato.en
dc.identifier.isbn0958250405
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/3226
dc.description.abstractTeaching academic English and study skills at tertiary level can be a restricted and pressured environment due to factors such as heavy course content, large numbers of students or lack of time to teach all areas that are needed. Situations like this often mean there is little opportunity for students to voice personal opinions on the content and method of how they are being taught in ESL oriented papers or their mainstream majors. It also means limited chances for them to articulate and share personal learning experiences and cultural backgrounds to allow them to extend their knowledge of their present situations. This paper describes how giving students time for reflection on these areas in an undergraduate second language academic discourse paper allowed them to contemplate learning and studying strategies for this and other papers they were engaged with. The outcomes for them included an increase in confidence to express themselves to their peers, a realisation that their previous learning and cultural backgrounds had value and use to their New Zealand experiences and a greater understanding of some basic tertiary processes. Web conferencing was used to support their reflection process. The results of these reflective exchanges for the tutor has had an impact on current and future curriculum design and led to the compiling of a list of simple but important factors that could of be of use to the wider tertiary community in their teaching of non-English speaking background students.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWilf Malcolm Institute of Educational Research, The University of Waikatoen
dc.subjectacademic englishen
dc.subjectenglish as a second languageen
dc.subjectreflectionen
dc.subjectreflective promptsen
dc.subjectweb conferencingen
dc.titleHow reflective exchanges of second language students can have an impact on their learning outcomes and on future curriculum planning in a tertiary environmenten
dc.typeConference Contributionen
dc.relation.isPartOfLED 2003 1st International Conference on Language, Education and Diversityen_NZ
pubs.begin-page1en_NZ
pubs.elements-id15966
pubs.end-page11en_NZ
pubs.finish-date2003-11-29en_NZ
pubs.place-of-publicationHamiltonen_NZ
pubs.start-date2003-11-26en_NZ


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