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dc.contributor.authorScarfe, Bradley Edward
dc.contributor.authorHealy, Terry R.
dc.contributor.authorRennie, Hamish Gordon
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-23T01:39:44Z
dc.date.available2009-10-23T01:39:44Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationScarfe, B. E., Healy, T. R. & Rennie, H. G. (2007). Research-based surfing literature for coastal management and the science of surfing—a review. Journal of Coastal Research, 25(3), 539-557.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/3301
dc.description.abstractIncorporating recreational surfing into coastal management practices is required to protect the seabed features and oceanographic processes that create surfing waves. A review of research-based surfing literature is undertaken to provide a summary of information available to assist in coastal management decision making around surfing breaks. The different categories of research-based surfing literature are identified as artificial surfing reef (ASR) design, ASR monitoring, ASR construction, ASR sediment dynamics, biomechanics, coastal management, economics and tourism, industry, numerical and physical modeling, surfers and waves, sociology, and physical processes. The majority of this research has been undertaken in the last decade, making it a relatively young research area. As a background for nonsurfing coastal researchers and managers, the characteristics of surfing waves and surfing breaks are described, referring to relevant literature. Wave height, peel angle, breaking intensity, and section length are identified as essential parameters to describe surfing waves. Existing surfer skill and maneuver categorization schemes are presented to show the relationship between surfers and surfing waves. The geomorphic categories of surfing breaks are identified as headland or point breaks, beach breaks, river or estuary entrance bars, reef breaks, and ledge breaks. The literature discusses the various scale bathymetric components that create these surfing breaks. Examples of modeling offshore wave transformations at Mount Maunganui, New Zealand, as well as the measurement microscale wave transformations at ‘‘The Ledge,’’ Raglan, New Zealand, are presented to demonstrate surfing wave transformations.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherCoastal Education & Research Foundation, Inc.en_NZ
dc.subjectsurfing breaksen
dc.subjectsurfing wave parametersen
dc.subjectwave focusingen
dc.subjectcoastal managementen
dc.subjectsurfing reefsen
dc.titleResearch-based surfing literature for coastal management and the science of surfing—a reviewen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.doi10.2112/07-0958.1en
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of Coastal Researchen_NZ
pubs.begin-page539en_NZ
pubs.elements-id34231
pubs.end-page557en_NZ
pubs.issue3en_NZ
pubs.volume25en_NZ


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