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dc.contributor.authorDaly, Nicola
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-27T00:00:53Z
dc.date.available2009-10-27T00:00:53Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationDaly, N. (2007). Kūkupa, koro, and kai: The use of Māori vocabulary items in New Zealand English children's picture books. New Zealand English Journal, 21, 20-33.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/3305
dc.description.abstractWhen a linguistic form from one language is used in another language, such words are known as borrowings or loan words (Crystal 2003: 56). The English language is renowned for its large capacity for borrowing and it has been suggested that the growth in internationalism in recent times has led to people seeking new words to indicate their local identity (Crystal 1995; Crystal 2003). Certainly this is the case of New Zealand English, the most distinctive aspect of which is borrowings from te reo Maori (Deverson 1991). In 1984 Deverson estimated that most New Zealanders have a passive knowledge of at least 40-50 borrowed Maori loan words (Deverson 1984). This figure has been recently revised by Macalister to 70-80 such words (20,-,63.). A study of the frequency of Maori loan words in New Zealand English in New Zealand School Journals of the 1960s and 1990s showed an incidence of around 6 words per 1,000 (Macalister 1999). Kennedy and Yamazaki (1999) also found borrowed Maori words at a rate of 6 per thousand words. Macalister (2006b) has examined the use of Maori loan words in New Zealand English across a 150 year period from 1850-2000. He examined a corpus of a little under five and a half million words from three sources: Newspapers, parliamentary debates and School Journals. Across the three sources there was an increase from 3.29 words per 1,000 in 1850 to 8.8 per thousand in 2000. Macalister lists the reasons for this change as including urbanisation of the Maori population between 1945 and 1975, which created more contact; the changing status of the Maori language with the kOhanga reo movement; the establishment of the Maori Language Commission (Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Maori) and legislation of Maori as an official language of New Zealand in 1987.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherVictoria University of Wellington, School of Linguistics and Applied Language Studiesen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.nzetc.org/tm/scholarly/name-122370.htmlen
dc.rightsThis article has been published in the journal: New Zealand English Journal. Used with permission.en
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.subjectMaorien
dc.subjectchildren’s picture booken
dc.subjectEnglishen
dc.subjectMaori vocabularyen
dc.titleKūkupa, koro, and kai: The use of Māori vocabulary items in New Zealand English children's picture booksen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.relation.isPartOfNew Zealand English Journalen_NZ
pubs.begin-page20en_NZ
pubs.elements-id32626
pubs.end-page33en_NZ
pubs.volume21en_NZ


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