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dc.contributor.authorCram, Fiona
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-29T02:15:18Z
dc.date.available2009-10-29T02:15:18Z
dc.date.issued1993
dc.identifier.citationCram, F. (1993). Ethics in Maori research: Working paper. In Nikora, L.W. (Ed.) Cultural Justice and Ethics. Proceedings of a symposium held at the Annual Conference of the New Zealand Psychological Society, University of Victoria, Wellington, 23-24 August 1993. (pp. 28-30).en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/3316
dc.description.abstractWhen we think about what we are doing as researchers, one of our main tasks is to acquire knowledge. For some researchers their task begins and ends there. Knowledge is viewed as cumulative, that by adding to some knowledge pool we will one day be able to put the component parts together and discover universal laws. Many researchers also assume that the knowledge they have collected is objective, value-free and apolitical. This is part of psychologists’ ‘physics envy’. A Maori view of knowledge is very different from this. For Maori the purpose of knowledge is to uphold the interests and the mana of the group; it serves the community. Researchers are not building up their own status; they are fighting for the betterment of their iwi and for Maori people in general.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherPsychology Department, University of Waikatoen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCultural Justice and Ethics Symposium 1993
dc.rightsCopyright © 1993 National Standing Committee on Bicultural Issuesen
dc.subjectMaorien
dc.subjectpsychologyen
dc.subjectcultural justiceen
dc.subjectethicsen
dc.subjectresearchen
dc.titleEthics in Maori research: Working paperen
dc.typeConference Contributionen


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