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dc.contributor.authorDorrington, Adrian A.
dc.contributor.authorCree, Michael J.
dc.contributor.authorCarnegie, Dale A.
dc.contributor.authorPayne, Andrew D.
dc.contributor.authorConroy, Richard M.
dc.contributor.authorGodbaz, John Peter
dc.contributor.authorJongenelen, Adrian P.P.
dc.coverage.spatialConference held at San Jose, California, USAen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-26T03:20:35Z
dc.date.available2010-04-26T03:20:35Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationAdrian A. Dorrington, Michael J. Cree, Dale A. Carnegie, Andrew D. Payne, Richard M. Conroy, John P. Godbaz and Adrian P.P. Jongenelen, "Video-rate or high-precision: A flexible range imaging camera," Image Processing: Machine Vision Applications, Kurt S. Niel, David Fofi, Editors, Proc. SPIE, 6813, 681307 (2008).en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/3820
dc.description.abstractA range imaging camera produces an output similar to a digital photograph, but every pixel in the image contains distance information as well as intensity. This is useful for measuring the shape, size and location of objects in a scene, hence is well suited to certain machine vision applications. Previously we demonstrated a heterodyne range imaging system operating in a relatively high resolution (512-by-512) pixels and high precision (0.4 mm best case) configuration, but with a slow measurement rate (one every 10 s). Although this high precision range imaging is useful for some applications, the low acquisition speed is limiting in many situations. The system’s frame rate and length of acquisition is fully configurable in software, which means the measurement rate can be increased by compromising precision and image resolution. In this paper we demonstrate the flexibility of our range imaging system by showing examples of high precision ranging at slow acquisition speeds and video-rate ranging with reduced ranging precision and image resolution. We also show that the heterodyne approach and the use of more than four samples per beat cycle provides better linearity than the traditional homodyne quadrature detection approach. Finally, we comment on practical issues of frame rate and beat signal frequency selection.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSPIE Vol. 6813, 68130Men_NZ
dc.rightsCopyright 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic or multiple reproduction, distribution to multiple locations via electronic or other means, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper are prohibited.en
dc.sourceConference on Image Processing - Machine Vision Applicationsen_NZ
dc.subjectrange imageen
dc.subjectrangingen
dc.subjectvideo rateen
dc.subjectprecisionen
dc.subjectlinearityen
dc.subjectresolutionen
dc.subjectthree dimensionalen
dc.subjectaliasen
dc.titleVideo-rate or high-precision: A flexible range imaging cameraen
dc.typeConference Contributionen
dc.identifier.doi10.1117/12.764752en
dc.relation.isPartOfProc. of SPIE-IS&T Electronic Imagingen_NZ
pubs.begin-page1en_NZ
pubs.elements-id17718
pubs.end-page12en_NZ
pubs.finish-date2008-01-31en_NZ
pubs.start-date2008-01-29en_NZ
pubs.volume6813en_NZ


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