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dc.contributor.authorCampbell, David I.
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-28T02:26:28Z
dc.date.available2010-04-28T02:26:28Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationCampbell, D.I. (2010). Hydrology. In M. Peters & B. Clarkson (Eds.), Wetland Restoration: A Handbook for New Zealand Freshwater System (pp. 75-100). Lincoln, New Zealand: Manaaki Whenua Press.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/3830
dc.description.abstractWhen applied to wetlands, the science of hydrology is concerned with how the storage and movement of water into and out of a wetland affects the plants and animals, and the soils on which they grow. Most wetland scientists agree that the single most important factor determining both wetland type and function is hydrology. Consequently, changes in hydrology are the leading causes of wetland degradation or destruction. The two case studies in this chapter illustrate how water was returned to a previously drained lowland swamp and a peat bog and the effects on the vegetation communities. Both sites had been drained as further dry land was desired for farming and urban development, a common scenario throughout New Zealand.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherManaaki Whenua Pressen
dc.relation.urihttp://www.landcareresearch.co.nz/services/biocons/wetlands/en
dc.rightsThis article has been published in the book: Wetland Restoration: A Handbook for New Zealand Freshwater System. Used with permission.en
dc.subjectwetlanden
dc.subjecthydrologyen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.titleHydrologyen
dc.typeChapter in Booken
dc.relation.isPartOfWetland Restoration: A Handbook for New Zealand Freshwater Systemsen_NZ
pubs.begin-page75en_NZ
pubs.elements-id9190
pubs.end-page100en_NZ


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