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dc.contributor.advisorKedian, Jeremy
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Arnna Rosaen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-10T03:03:20Z
dc.date.available2010-08-10T03:03:20Z
dc.date.issued2010en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationGraham, A. R. (2010). Principal Professional Learning in New Zealand: How does it happen? Understanding the value of profound professional learning for experienced principals (Thesis, Master of Educational Leadership (MEdLeadership)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/4284en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/4284
dc.description.abstractProfound professional learning for principals makes a difference to student achievement. While indirect, the impact of effective principal practice has a ripple effect throughout the community of learners of a school. The principal is, and should be, the lead learner of the school. Authenticity in this action brings credibility. This credibility establishes the principal as a significant role model. This qualitative research provides some insight to the understanding and practices of experienced effective principals and their professional learning in a New Zealand context. The findings suggest that there are measures of effectiveness for New Zealand principals, however ascertaining what to measure is somewhat difficult. Knowledge of tools to support the identification of learning needs is limited and therefore not significant in the practice of these principals. Drivers and barriers to professional learning are identifiable. Work/life balance is highlighted as both a measure of effectiveness and a filter for professional learning. This is one of many filters explored. Recognition is given to the positioning of New Zealand principalship in a post-modern paradigm and the conflict that arises when measures of neo-liberal accountabilities are employed. The significance of school context and culture are highlighted as conditions for profound professional learning. The culture of traditional learning through principal clusters is challenged. Recommendations and considerations are offered to both principal colleagues and the Ministry of Education as a result of these findings. These include the need for principal mentoring and secondment to external, national bodies as part of professional learning for all principals. The value of professional learning is highlighted. More significantly principals are challenged to embrace and develop an authentic culture of professional learning.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Waikatoen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectlead learneren_NZ
dc.subjectleadershipen_NZ
dc.subjectauthenticityen_NZ
dc.subjectcredibilityen_NZ
dc.subjecteffectivenessen_NZ
dc.subjectwork/life balanceen_NZ
dc.subjectrole modelen_NZ
dc.subjectschool contexten_NZ
dc.subjectschool cultureen_NZ
dc.subjectmentoringen_NZ
dc.subjectconditionsen_NZ
dc.subjectbarriers to professional learningen_NZ
dc.subjectimpact of professional learningen_NZ
dc.subjectstudent achievementen_NZ
dc.subjectmeasuresen_NZ
dc.titlePrincipal Professional Learning in New Zealand: How does it happen? Understanding the value of profound professional learning for experienced principalsen_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineProfessional Studies in Educationen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Waikatoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Educational Leadership (MEdLeadership)en_NZ
uow.date.accession2010-02-23en_NZ
uow.identifier.adthttp://adt.waikato.ac.nz/uploads/adt-uow20100223.113143
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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