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dc.contributor.authorSharrock, Keith R.
dc.contributor.authorSissons, Christopher H.
dc.contributor.authorDaniel, Roy M.
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Hugh W.
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-13T04:44:03Z
dc.date.available2010-09-13T04:44:03Z
dc.date.issued1983
dc.identifier.citationSharrock, K.R., Sissons, C.H., Daniel, R.M. & Morgan, H.W. (1983). Cellulases from extremely thermophilic bacteria. Chemistry in New Zealand, 47(3), 62-64.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/4566
dc.description.abstractCellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on earth, and is the major component of urban waste. Thus cellulose must be seen as a very significant renewable source of chemical foodstocks when fossil fuels become restricted.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNew Zealand Institute of Chemistryen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://nzic.org.nz/CiNZ/CiNZ.htmlen_NZ
dc.rightsThis article has been published in Chemistry in New Zealand. © 1983 Chemistry in New Zealand. Used with permission.en_NZ
dc.subjectbiologyen_NZ
dc.titleCellulases from extremely thermophilic bacteriaen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ


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