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dc.contributor.authorSamkin, Grant
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-08T02:14:07Z
dc.date.available2010-11-08T02:14:07Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationSamkin, G. (2010). Trader sailor spy: The case of John Pringle and the transfer of accounting technology to the Cape of Good Hope. Accounting History, 15(4), 505-528.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/4765
dc.description.abstractThe transfer of accounting technology to the southern hemisphere during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries has been considered previously by Carnegie and Parker (1996), Foreman (2001) and Carnegie et al. (2006). Set at the Cape of Good Hope in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century, this study adopts a microhistory approach to evaluate the contribution made by John Pringle, an employee of the East India Company, to the transfer of British-style accounting technology. The circumstances of the time mean that, as an individual, Pringle’s long-term contribution to the transfer of accounting technology was minimal and limited to training the assistants he employed. As far as can be established, this is the first article that considers how an individual, who was not an accounting author, contributed to the transfer of British-style accounting technology to southern Africa.en_NZ
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSageen_NZ
dc.subjectaccounting technologyen_NZ
dc.subjecteast India companyen_NZ
dc.subjectPringleen_NZ
dc.subjectsouthern Africaen_NZ
dc.titleTrader sailor spy: The case of John Pringle and the transfer of accounting technology to the Cape of Good Hopeen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1032373210373132en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfAccounting Historyen_NZ
pubs.begin-page505en_NZ
pubs.elements-id35446
pubs.end-page528en_NZ
pubs.issue4en_NZ
pubs.volume15en_NZ


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