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dc.contributor.authorAnderson, David L.
dc.contributor.authorTressler, John
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-18T03:16:04Z
dc.date.available2011-01-18T03:16:04Z
dc.date.issued2010-05
dc.identifier.citationAnderson, D.L. & Tressler, J. (2010). The merits of using citation‐based journal weighting schemes to measure research performance in economics: The case of New Zealand. (Department of Economics Working Paper Series, Number 10/03). Hamilton, New Zealand: University of Waikato.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/4948
dc.description.abstractIn this study we test various citation‐based journal weighting schemes, especially those based on the Liebowitz and Palmer methodology, as to their suitability for use in a nationwide research funding model. Using data generated by New Zealand’s academic economists, we compare the performance of departments, and individuals, under each of our selected schemes; and we then proceed to contrast these results with those generated by direct citation counts. Our findings suggest that if all citations are deemed to be of equal value, then schemes based on the Liebowitz and Palmer methodology yield problematic outcomes. We also demonstrate that even between weighting schemes based on a common methodology, major differences are found to exist in departmental and individual outcomes.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Waikato, Waikato Management Schoolen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDepartment of Economics Working Paper Series
dc.subjectEconomics Departmentsen_NZ
dc.subjectresearch outputen_NZ
dc.subjectcitationsen_NZ
dc.subjectimpact factorsen_NZ
dc.titleThe merits of using citation‐based journal weighting schemes to measure research performance in economics: The case of New Zealanden_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
uow.relation.series10/03
dc.relation.isPartOfWorking Paper in Economicsen_NZ
pubs.elements-id54055


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