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dc.contributor.authorSumpter, Catherine E.
dc.contributor.authorTemple, William
dc.contributor.authorFoster, T. Mary
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-21T04:42:02Z
dc.date.available2011-06-21T04:42:02Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationSumpter, C.E., Temple, W. & Foster, T.M. (2004). Comparing demand functions when different price manipulations are used: Does unit price help? Learning & Behavior, 32(2), 202-212.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/5412
dc.description.abstractSix hens pecked a key (Experiment 1) or pushed a door (Experiment 2) to obtain food reinforcement. In both experiments and as an analogue of price changes, the response requirements were varied in two ways: by increasing the number of responses required and by increasing the required force of each response. The two price manipulations (response number and response force) had different effects on behavior and produced different-shaped demand functions when the rates of consumption were plotted logarithmically against the price analogues. Irrespective of response topography, when the number of required responses was varied, the data paths appeared linear, with slopes close to -1.0. When the required force of each keypeck and doorpush was varied, the data paths were clearly curved, with increasingly steep downward slopes as the force increased. Using the concept of unit price did not fully remove the different effects of the two price manipulations. Those differences are best attributed to the differing times needed in order to complete each response unit under those price manipulations.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherPsychonomic Society Incen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.springerlink.com/content/d841444033723763/en_NZ
dc.rightsThis article has been published in the journal: Learning & Behavior. © 2004 Psychonomic Society, Inc. Used with permission.en_NZ
dc.subjectpsychologyen_NZ
dc.titleComparing demand functions when different price manipulations are used: Does unit price help?en_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.3758/BF03196021en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfLearning and Behavioren_NZ
pubs.begin-page202en_NZ
pubs.elements-id30023
pubs.end-page212en_NZ
pubs.issue2en_NZ
pubs.volume32en_NZ


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