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dc.contributor.advisorSwain, David
dc.contributor.advisorMacdonald, Judith
dc.contributor.advisorPaterson, John
dc.contributor.authorJones, Olive
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-05T03:24:15Z
dc.date.available2012-01-05T03:24:15Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationJones, O. (2011). Keeping it together: A comparative analysis of four long-established intentional communities in New Zealand (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)). University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/5962en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/5962
dc.description.abstractThrough a comparative analysis of four long-lived intentional communities in New Zealand, this thesis examines the extent to which each one has sustained, adapted or abandoned its original ideals and aspirations over time. An analysis of in-depth interviews with current and former participants from each community reveals ways that ideological beliefs, organisational processes, and foundation structures have shaped the distinctive cultures that have developed. The relevance of the assertion that long-lived intentional communities share a common purpose and a desire to live beyond mainstream society, and the assumption that longevity and survival can be considered to be the same thing, are challenged. It is concluded that ownership structures for holding land are significant to the longevity of intentional communities, and that the distinctions that once existed between alternative-orientated communities and the larger society that they are situated within have become less clear over time.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Waikato
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectintentional communities
dc.subjectalternative lifestyles
dc.subjectlongevity and survival
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.titleKeeping it together: A comparative analysis of four long-established intentional communities in New Zealanden
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Waikato
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.updated2011-12-15T19:12:55Z
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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