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dc.contributor.authorMolan, Peter C.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T21:34:48Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T21:34:48Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationMolan, P.C. (2009). Honey: Antimicrobial actions and role in disease management. In I. Ahmad & F. Aqil (Eds.), New Strategies Combating Bacterial Infection (pp.229-253). Weinheim: Wiley VCH.en_NZ
dc.identifier.isbn9783527622931
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/6096
dc.description.abstractThe ancient treatment of dressing infected wounds with honey is rapidly becoming re-established in professional medicine, especially where wounds are infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This is because of the demonstrated sensitivity of such bacteria to the antibacterial activity of honey, which is not influenced by whether or not strains are resistant to antibiotics. Honey has been found to have a very broad spectrum of activity, but its potency of antibacterial activity can vary greatly. In most honeys the antibacterial activity is due to enzymatically produced hydrogen peroxide and thus the potency of its antibacterial activity can be decreased by catalase present in an open wound. Manuka honey has an antibacterial component derived from the plant source. Manuka honey with a quality-assured level of antibacterial activity is being used by companies marketing honey products for wound care that are registered with the medical regulatory authorities in various countries. Such honey can be diluted IO-fold or more and still completely inhibit the usual wound-infecting species. There is a large amount of clinical evidence for the effectiveness of honey in clearing infection in wounds, and some clinical evidence of its effectiveness in treating other infections. Although the antibacterial potency of honey is insufficient to allow its use systemically, there are various clinical applications besides wound care in which it is used topically or where it does not get excessively diluted, such as for treatment of gastritis, enteritis, gingivitis, ophthalmological infections and bronchial infections. In most of these applications the anti-inflammatory activity of honey is of additional benefit in decreasing the inflammation resulting from infection. Additional clinical research is needed to provide better evidence of the effectiveness of honey in these therapeutic applications of honey.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaAen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/9783527622931.ch9/summaryen_NZ
dc.rightsCopyright © 2009 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. Used with permission.en_NZ
dc.subjecthoneyen_NZ
dc.subjectwound dressingen_NZ
dc.subjectinfected woundsen_NZ
dc.subjectantibiotic resistanceen_NZ
dc.subjectclinical evidenceen_NZ
dc.subjectanti-inflammatoryen_NZ
dc.titleHoney: Antimicrobial actions and role in disease managementen_NZ
dc.typeChapter in Booken_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/9783527622931.ch9en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfNew Strategies Combating Bacterial Infectionen_NZ
pubs.begin-page229en_NZ
pubs.elements-id8877
pubs.end-page253en_NZ


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