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dc.contributor.authorThorpe, Holly Aysha
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-18T03:25:37Z
dc.date.available2012-04-18T03:25:37Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationThorpe, H. (2004). Embodied boarders: Snowboarding, status and style. Waikato Journal of Education, 10, 181-201.en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn1173-6135
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/6225
dc.description.abstractThe body is a symbol of status, a system of social markings and a site of distinctions. Drawing on documentary and visual sources, combined with participant observations, this article explores the body as a signifier through an examination of numerous cultural practices used by snowboarders to distinguish themselves from non-snowboarders and each other. In examining embodied snowboarders I firstly analyse their cultural tastes and styles of dress, language and bodily deportment. Secondly, I consider how boarders earn symbolic capital through demonstrations of commitment, physical prowess and risk taking. This analysis implicitly views the body as a social phenomenon, that is, it conceptualises the body as a possessor of power, a form of status, a bearer of symbolic value and a form of physical capital. The body now plays a central role in producing and reproducing social groups and the "embodied boarder" is an important case study for understanding how contemporary youth both construct and make sense of their worlds.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherFaculty of Education, University of Waikatoen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.wje.org.nz/index.php
dc.rights© 2004 Waikato Journal of Education. It is posted here by permission for personal use.en_NZ
dc.subjecteducationen_NZ
dc.titleEmbodied boarders: Snowboarding, status and style.en_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ


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