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dc.contributor.authorSancho, Leopoldo G.
dc.contributor.authorGreen, T.G. Allan
dc.contributor.authorPintado, Ana
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-28T02:17:45Z
dc.date.available2012-05-28T02:17:45Z
dc.date.copyright2007-11
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationSancho, L., Green, T.G.A. & Pintado, A. (2007). Slowest to fastest: Extreme range in lichen growth rates supports their use as an indicator of climate change in Antarctica. Flora-Morphology, Distribution, Functional Ecology of Plants, 202(8), 667-673.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/6367
dc.description.abstractGlobal temperature rise is suggested to be greater and more rapid in polar regions. There has been a clear temperature rise of 0.056 °C y⁻¹ in the Antarctic Peninsula and this has led to changes in higher plant extent and range. In the more extreme environments of the main continent the vegetation is scattered and composed of lichens and mosses. There is interest in the possible effects of global climatechange on these communities acting through changes in temperature and precipitation. Lichens have been extensively used to date the substrates on which they are growing using the techniques of lichenometry. The slowgrowth and longevity of lichens particularly suites them for this use. We present evidence that there appears to be a substantial (two orders of magnitude) cline in lichengrowthrate from the warmer, wetter and more productive Peninsula to the cold Dry Valleys at 77°S latitude. The differences in growthrate reflect the precipitation and temperature regimes at the different sites. The large range in growthrates coupled with the simplicity of measuring lichengrowth using modern techniques suggests that this could be an excellent tool for the detection of climatechange in continental Antarctica.en_NZ
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevieren_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofFlora - Morphology, Distribution, Functional Ecology of Plants
dc.relation.urihttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0367253007000886en_NZ
dc.subjectlichenometryen_NZ
dc.subjectbiomonitoringen_NZ
dc.subjectRhizocarponen_NZ
dc.subjectBuelliaen_NZ
dc.subjectCape Halletten_NZ
dc.subjectDry Valleysen_NZ
dc.titleSlowest to fastest: Extreme range in lichen growth rates supports their use as an indicator of climate change in Antarcticaen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.flora.2007.05.005en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfFloraen_NZ
pubs.begin-page667en_NZ
pubs.elements-id37099
pubs.end-page673en_NZ
pubs.issue8en_NZ
pubs.volume202en_NZ


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