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dc.contributor.authorNemet, Andreja
dc.contributor.authorKlemeš, Jiří Jaromir
dc.contributor.authorVarbanov, Petar S.
dc.contributor.authorAtkins, Martin John
dc.contributor.authorWalmsley, Michael R.W.
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-15T21:10:30Z
dc.date.available2013-01-15T21:10:30Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationNemet, A., Klemeš, J.J., Varbanov, P., Aktins, M.J., Walmsley, M. (2012). Total site methodology as a tool for planning and strategic decisions. Chemical Engineering Transactions, 29, pp. 115-120.en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn1974-9791
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/7057
dc.description.abstractA Total Site (TS) is defined as a set of processes (industrial plants, residential, business and agriculture units) linked through the central utility system. The utility system incorporates a number of operating units such as boilers, steam turbines, gas turbines and letdown stations. Many sites are using the TS system representation. Heat Integration at TS level has been well developed and successfully implemented. However, sites typically develop with time and even minor changes/extensions can affect TS heat recovery significantly. It is beneficial to plan their strategic development in advance, to increase or at least not to decrease the rate of heat recovery when integration of additional processes takes place. Even when this has not been done at the initial stage, the TS methodology can still be used as a tool for the strategic planning decision making. This work illustrates how the TS methodology can contribute to the strategic development and the extension planning of already existing TS. The aim is to reveal the potentials for Heat Integration, when new units or processes are considered for the inclusion in the TS. Moreover, some operating parameters (e.g. temperature or capacity) of the unit can be proposed to achieve the best possible heat recovery. The degrees of freedom for TS changes can be on two levels: (i) only adding an operating unit to the current utility system (the Total Site Profiles remain the same) or (ii) changing of the TS by including more processes (the Total Site Profiles are changed). The first group of changes includes the integration of heat engines to produce electricity utilising heat at higher temperature and returning it to the system at lower temperature, which is still acceptable for the heat recovery and simultaneously for the electricity production. The second group of changes is more complex. For evaluating these changes a plus/minus principle is developed allowing the most beneficial integration of new units to the TS. Combinations of both types of changes are also considered.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAIDIC Servizi S.r.l.en_NZ
dc.rightsCopyright © 2012, AIDIC Servizi S.r.l. Used with permission.
dc.subjectElectricity productionen_NZ
dc.subjectHeat integrationen_NZ
dc.subjectInitial stagesen_NZ
dc.subjectOperating parametersen_NZ
dc.subjectOperating unitsen_NZ
dc.subjectSecond groupen_NZ
dc.subjectStrategic decisionsen_NZ
dc.subjectStrategic developmenen_NZ
dc.subjectSystem representationen_NZ
dc.subjectUtility systemsen_NZ
dc.titleTotal site methodology as a tool for planning and strategic decisionsen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.3303/CET1229020en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfChemical Engineering Transactionsen_NZ
pubs.begin-page115en_NZ
pubs.elements-id37980
pubs.end-page120en_NZ
pubs.volume29en_NZ


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