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dc.contributor.authorWeston, Rowland
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-04T19:47:49Z
dc.date.available2013-03-04T19:47:49Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationWeston, R. (2011). Teaching history is talking history. TDU talk, 5, 4-5.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/7305
dc.description.abstractLike many teachers, my early practice was in equal parts reiteration and repudiation of the models to which I had been exposed as a student. As a consequence of my own shyness I took great efforts not to place students in uncomfortable positions, particularly with regard to speaking in class. In retrospect, I can appreciate that I did not encourage or provide adequate opportunities for discussion. As I designed and reflected on my own pedagogic initiatives, it became clear that discussion underpinned the learning taking place in all classroom activities. Brookfield and Preskill have thoroughly and perspicaciously enumerated the myriad learning benefits accruing from the use of ―discussion as a way of teaching‖; and I am now convinced that it is integral to the learning process. Thus, I attempt to create a classroom in which students are encouraged to talk and feel comfortable doing so.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Waikatoen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.waikato.ac.nz/tdu/resources/tdutalk.shtmlen_NZ
dc.rights© 2011 University of Waikato. Used with permissionen_NZ
dc.titleTeaching history is talking historyen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfTDU Talken_NZ
pubs.begin-page4en_NZ
pubs.editionNovember/Decemberen_NZ
pubs.elements-id36888
pubs.end-page5en_NZ
pubs.volume5en_NZ


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