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dc.contributor.authorDickson, Matiu
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-15T20:40:31Z
dc.date.available2013-04-15T20:40:31Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationDickson, M. (2010). Te Piringa. Waikato Law Review, 18, 66-71.en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn1172-9597
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/7463
dc.description.abstractMāori have an oral tradition, that is, the transfer of knowledge within and between generations, which was carried out orally by way of story-telling or the more formal speech-making. Ngā korero purākau are the stories and whaikōrero is formal talking on the marae or ancestral gathering places of Māori people. The value of public speaking is expressed in the saying: Ko te kōrerote kai a te Rangatira – (The chiefs thrive on talking and debating). This article looks at the transfer of knowledge to the next generation.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Waikatoen_NZ
dc.rights© 2010 University of Waikato. used with permission.en_NZ
dc.titleTe Piringaen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfWaikato Law Reviewen_NZ
pubs.begin-page66en_NZ
pubs.elements-id37057
pubs.end-page71en_NZ
pubs.volume18en_NZ


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