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dc.contributor.authorPratt, Douglas
dc.date.accessioned2008-04-01T21:56:20Z
dc.date.available2008-04-01T21:56:20Z
dc.date.issued2006-12
dc.identifier.citationPratt, D. (2006). Religious Fundamentalism and Extremism: A Paradigm Analysis. Paper presented for The Council of Christians and Muslims, and the Rasheed Memorial Dawah Trust Inc, 2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/750
dc.description.abstractTwo books, Islam & the West Post 9/11 and Islam and the West: reflections from Australia, cover a range of theoretical issues, regional-specific topics and case studies that explore issues related to the theme of Islam and the West. These are but two in a great flood of publications. Interest in contemporary Islam is high. The stakes are high. If global warming is a cause for concern, the idea of an interreligious meltdown between Islam and Christianity – which between them encompass the majority of the entire population of the globe – cannot be lightly brushed aside, given today the upsurge in ‘fundamentalist’ (I use this expression cautiously) ideologies and related assertive, even terrorist, activities. But there are two other recent books which argue, in effect, that a meltdown is by no means inevitable, and that, indeed, the prospect for friendship between the peoples of these two great religions is eminently possible and supremely to be desired.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.sourceThe Council of Christians and Muslims, and the Rasheed Memorial Dawah Trust Inc, Aucklanden_NZ
dc.subjectreligionen_US
dc.subjectChristianityen_US
dc.subjectIslamen_US
dc.subjectreligious conflicten_US
dc.titleFrom competition and conversion to co-operation and conversation: Dynamics of Christian-Muslim engagementen_US
dc.typeOral Presentationen_US
pubs.elements-id6587


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