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dc.contributor.authorGreasley, David
dc.contributor.authorOxley, Les
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-26T04:05:57Z
dc.date.available2013-04-26T04:05:57Z
dc.date.copyright2010-12-14
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationGreasley, D., & Oxley, L. (2010).Clio and the economist: Making historian count. Journal of Economic Surveys, 24(5), 755-774.en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn0950-0804
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/7532
dc.description.abstractCliometrics reconnected economic history and economics in the 1960s. The deeper foundations of cliometrics research lie in the longer standing traditions of quantitative history and the contemporaneous growth of the social sciences and computing. Early cliometrics research reinterpreted economic history through the lens of neo-classical economics. Over the past half century cliometrics has matured and now utilizes a broad array of theoretical perspectives and statistical methods to help understand the past. The papers introduced here illustrate the achievements of several key areas of cliometrics research and show how new theoretical perspectives, innovative data construction and sophisticated econometric methods are the hallmarks of the discipline.en_NZ
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWileyen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Economic Surveys
dc.subjectAnthropometricsen_NZ
dc.subjectCliometricsen_NZ
dc.subjectHuman development indexen_NZ
dc.subjectImmigrationen_NZ
dc.subjectSocial savingsen_NZ
dc.subjectSocial welfare programmesen_NZ
dc.subjectTime seriesen_NZ
dc.titleClio and the economist: Making historian counten_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-6419.2010.00649.xen_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of Economic Surveysen_NZ
pubs.begin-page755en_NZ
pubs.elements-id37087
pubs.end-page774en_NZ
pubs.issue5en_NZ
pubs.volume24en_NZ


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