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dc.contributor.authorWilliam, Jennings
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-07T04:07:41Z
dc.date.available2013-06-07T04:07:41Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationWilliam, J. (2013). The Marist missionaries' first encounters with inhabitants of the Pacific. Australian Journal of French Studies, 50(1), 115-149.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/7689
dc.description.abstractMissionaries of the French-based Society of Mary (Marists) arrived in the Pacific in the late 1830s. Reports by European travellers and missionaries had told the first Marists to expect Pacific peoples who were either cannibals or noble savages. Their encounter with recently-converted Mangarevans in the Gambier Islands led them to believe that idyllic Christian societies could be created in the South Pacific. This belief influenced the first Marists' descriptions of Pacific peoples, notably New Zealand Maori. The Marists consequently emphasised the noble savage trope and downplayed cannibalism. They also displayed a relatively tolerant attitude towards indigenous practices.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherLiverpool University Pressen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.waikato.ac.nz/docview/1353056891/13E8247BA16265C554E/10?accountid=17287en_NZ
dc.subjectmissionariesen_NZ
dc.subjectreligious missionsen_NZ
dc.subjectChristianityen_NZ
dc.subjectcannibalismen_NZ
dc.subjectreligious conversionen_NZ
dc.titleThe Marist missionaries' first encounters with inhabitants of the Pacificen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.3828/ajfs.2013.8en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfAustralian Journal of French Studiesen_NZ
pubs.begin-page115en_NZ
pubs.elements-id39140
pubs.end-page127en_NZ
pubs.issue1en_NZ
pubs.volume50en_NZ


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