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dc.contributor.authorGibson, John
dc.contributor.authorMcKenzie, David
dc.contributor.authorStillman, Steven
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-23T21:17:51Z
dc.date.available2014-02-02T19:50:28Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationGibson, J., McKenzie, D. & Stillman, S. (2013). Accounting for selectivity and duration-dependent heterogeneity when estimating the impact of emigration on incomes and poverty in sending areas. Economic Development and Cultural Change, 61(2), 247-280.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/7738
dc.description.abstractThe impacts of international emigration and remittances on incomes and poverty in sending areas are increasingly studied with household survey data. But comparing households with and without emigrants is complicated by a triple-selectivity problem: first, households self-select into emigration; second, in some emigrant households everyone moves while others leave members behind; and third, some emigrants choose to return to the origin country. Allowing for duration-dependent heterogeneity introduces a fourth form of selectivity—we must now worry not just about whether households migrate, but also when they do so. This paper sets out these selectivity issues and their implications for existing migration studies and then addresses them by using survey data designed specifically to take advantage of a randomized lottery that determines which applicants to the oversubscribed Samoan Quota (SQ) may immigrate to New Zealand. We compare incomes and poverty rates among left-behind members in households in Samoa that sent SQ emigrants with those for members of similar households that were unsuccessful in the lottery. Policy rules control who can accompany the principal migrant, providing an instrument to address the second selectivity problem, while differences among migrants in which year their ballot was selected allow us to estimate duration effects. We find that migration reduced poverty among former household members but also find suggestive evidence that this effect may be short-lived as both remittances and agricultural income are negatively related to the duration that the migrant has been abroad.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherThe University of Chicago Pressen_NZ
dc.rights© 2013 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.
dc.subjectInternationale Wanderungen_NZ
dc.subjectInternational migrationen_NZ
dc.subjectPrivater Haushalten_NZ
dc.subjectHouseholden_NZ
dc.titleAccounting for selectivity and duration-dependent heterogeneity when estimating the impact of emigration on incomes and poverty in sending areasen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/668276
dc.relation.isPartOfEconomic Development and Cultural Changeen_NZ
pubs.begin-page247en_NZ
pubs.elements-id38233
pubs.end-page280en_NZ
pubs.issue2en_NZ
pubs.volume61en_NZ


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