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dc.contributor.authorHarcourt, Mark
dc.contributor.authorLam, Helen
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-03T02:25:08Z
dc.date.available2013-07-03T02:25:08Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationHarcourt, M. & Lam, H. (2012). Collaboration between unions in a multi-union, non-exclusive bargaining regime: What can Canada learn from New Zealand? International Journal of Employment Studies, 20(2), 5-31.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/7751
dc.description.abstractThe Canadian union certification system guarantees workers rights to organise, bargain collectively, and strike only when a majority of co-workers favours unionisation. This contravenes International Labour Organisation standards, in which the freedom to associate is unqualified by majority support. In recent years, the Supreme Court of Canada has drawn on ILO principles to interpret constitutional rights as covering organising and collective bargaining activities related to freedom of association under section 2(d) of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. However, it has not as yet ordered Canadian governments to enact labour relations laws consistent with these new constitutional rights. Neither has there been a general call for such legislative change. Instead, many fear that statutory support for non-majority unionism would lead to multi-union representation and intensified inter-union competition, but fail to consider that sharing the workplace might actually promote inter-union cooperation against a common adversary in management. This study addresses this shortcoming by looking at the extent and nature of inter-union collaboration in New Zealand, where non-majority, non-exclusive representation exists already. Collaboration was found to be common, not only over bargaining and lobbying, but also in organising. Implications for Canada are explored.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherInternational Employment Relations Associationen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://iera.net.au/ijes_14.htmlen_NZ
dc.rightsThis article has been published in the journal: International Journal of Employment Studies. Used with permission.en_NZ
dc.titleCollaboration between unions in a multi-union, non-exclusive bargaining regime: What can Canada learn from New Zealand?en_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfInternational Journal of Employment Studiesen_NZ
pubs.begin-page5en_NZ
pubs.elements-id38237
pubs.end-page29en_NZ
pubs.issue2en_NZ
pubs.volume20en_NZ


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