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dc.contributor.authorSichone, Kavwa
dc.contributor.authorLay, Mark C.
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Tom
dc.contributor.authorVerbeek, Casparus Johan R.
dc.contributor.authorKay, Hamish
dc.contributor.authorvan den Berg, Lisa E.
dc.coverage.spatialConference held at Wellington, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-08T01:52:07Z
dc.date.available2013-08-08T01:52:07Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationSichone, K., Lay, M., White, T., Verbeek, C. J. R., Kay, H. & van den Berg, L. (2012). Pilot scale pyrolysis - determination of critical moisture content for sustainable organic waste pyrolysis. In Proceedings of Chemeca 2012: Quality of life through chemical engineering: 23-26 September 2012, Wellington, New Zealand. (pp. 281-293).en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/7835
dc.description.abstractEconomic feasibility of large scale organic waste pyrolysis was investigated for Inghams Enterprise (Waitoa) chicken dissolved air flotation sludge (DAF) and activated sludge (biosolids) from the Hamilton municipal waste water treatment plant. Processing data was obtained from pilot plant trials using the Lakeland Steel (Rotorua) continuous auger pyrolysis plant using feedstock at 15, 30, 45 and ~80% moisture contents. Economics were calculated based on estimated capital and operating costs of a large scale facility, revenue from selling char, savings from landfill diversion (including transportation and gate costs), energy savings by recycling syngas product and using waste heat for drying feedstock. For DAF, 15% moisture content gave yields of 21% syngas, 27% char, and 52% oil (dry weight basis). 15% moisture content gave the best processing conditions based on handling properties and degree of autogenesis. The DAF case does not give a payback period due to low scale of operations. For biosolids, 15% moisture content feedstock gave yields of 46% syngas, 31% char, and 21% oil (wet weight). Difficulties were found with plant blockages at 45% and 80% moisture contents. 15% moisture content gave the best processing conditions and the best economic performance with a payback time of 4.6 years for a facility that could process 11,000 tonnes per year.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherEngineers Australiaen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.chemeca2012.com/en_NZ
dc.rightsThis article has been published in the proceedings of Chemeca 2012: Quality of life through chemical engineering. Used with permission.en_NZ
dc.titlePilot scale pyrolysis - determination of critical moisture content for sustainable organic waste pyrolysisen_NZ
dc.typeConference Contributionen_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfCHEMECA 2012 - Quality of Life through Chemical Engineeringen_NZ
pubs.begin-page281en_NZ
pubs.elements-id22877
pubs.end-page293en_NZ
pubs.finish-date2012-09-26en_NZ
pubs.place-of-publicationBarton, A.C.T.en_NZ
pubs.start-date2012-09-23en_NZ


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