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dc.contributor.authorMouterde, Solveig C.
dc.contributor.authorDuganzich, David M.
dc.contributor.authorMolles, Laura E.
dc.contributor.authorHelps, Shireen
dc.contributor.authorHelps, Francis
dc.contributor.authorWaas, Joseph R.
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-04T02:49:47Z
dc.date.available2013-10-04T02:49:47Z
dc.date.copyright2012-03
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationMouterde, S. C., Duganzich, D. M., Molles, L. E., Helps, S., Helps, F., & Waas, J. R. (2012). Triumph displays inform eavesdropping little blue penguins of new dominance asymmetries. Animal Behaviour, 83(3), 605-611.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/8055
dc.description.abstractAgonistic signals used during contests over important resources have been extensively studied; postconflict signals have received comparatively little attention. While ‘triumph displays’, performed by winners following fights, have been described for many species, no experiment has yet assessed one of the main hypotheses explaining their existence: advertising victory to social eavesdroppers. Our experiments evaluated the impact of triumph calls on the behaviour and stress responses of surrounding penguins. We found that territorial male little blue penguins, Eudyptula minor, having previously been exposed to playback of a vocal exchange between conspecifics followed by the sounds of a fight, had higher heart rates in response to the winner’s call than that of the loser; females had high rates in response to both winners and losers. Males were also less likely to threaten winners than losers vocally during a simulated approach of their burrow, while females remained silent in both contexts. Our findings support the hypothesis that triumph calls facilitate an association of winners’ distinctive vocalizations with stress generated by nearby overt aggression. By advertising their victories, males may establish a ‘reputation’ for winning fights within the social group, potentially reducing the likelihood of being challenged by eavesdroppers in future contests.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherElsevieren_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofAnimal Behaviour
dc.relation.urihttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003347211005240en_NZ
dc.subjectagonistic interactionen_NZ
dc.subjectEudyptula minoren_NZ
dc.subjectlittle blue penguinen_NZ
dc.subjectsocial eavesdroppingen_NZ
dc.subjecttriumph displayen_NZ
dc.titleTriumph displays inform eavesdropping little blue penguins of new dominance asymmetriesen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.anbehav.2011.11.032en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfAnimal Behaviouren_NZ
pubs.begin-page605en_NZ
pubs.elements-id37241
pubs.end-page611en_NZ
pubs.issue3en_NZ
pubs.volume83en_NZ


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