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dc.contributor.authorKrishnamurthi, Rita
dc.contributor.authorWitt, Emma
dc.contributor.authorBarker-Collo, Suzanne
dc.contributor.authorMcPherson, Kathryn
dc.contributor.authorDavis-Martin, Kelly
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Derrick
dc.contributor.authorRush, Elaine
dc.contributor.authorSuh, Flora
dc.contributor.authorStarkey, Nicola J.
dc.contributor.authorParag, Varsha
dc.contributor.authorRathnasabapathy, Yogini
dc.contributor.authorJones, Amy
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Paul
dc.contributor.authorTe Ao, Braden
dc.contributor.authorFeigin, Valery L.
dc.coverage.spatialEnglanden_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-29T02:41:17Z
dc.date.available2013-10-29T02:41:17Z
dc.date.copyright2013-11-27
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationKrishnamurthi, R., Witt, E., Barker-Collo, S., McPherson, K., Davis-Martin, K., …, ARCOS IV Porgramme Group (2013). Reducing recurrent stroke: Methodology of the motivational interviewing in stroke (MIST) randomized clinical trial. International Journal of Stroke, published online 27 October 2013.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/8122
dc.description.abstractRationale Recurrent stroke is prevalent in both developed and developing countries, contributing significantly to disability and death. Recurrent stroke rates can be reduced by adequate risk factor management. However, adherence to prescribed medications and lifestyle changes recommended by physicians at discharge after stroke is poor, leading to a large number of preventable recurrent strokes. Using behavior change methods such as Motivational Interviewing early after stroke occurrence has the potential to prevent recurrent stroke. Aims and/or hypothesis The overall aim of the study is to determine the effectiveness of motivational interviewing in improving adherence to medication and lifestyle changes recommended by treating physicians at and after hospital discharge in stroke patients 12 months poststroke to reduce risk factors for recurrent stroke. Design Recruitment of 430 first-ever stroke participants will occur in the Auckland and Waikato regions. Randomization will be to intervention or usual care groups. Participants randomized to intervention will receive four motivational interviews and five follow-up assessments over 12 months. Nonintervention participants will be assessed at the same time points. Study outcomes Primary outcome measures are changes in systolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein levels 12 months poststroke. Secondary outcomes include self-reported adherence and barriers to prescribed medications, new cardiovascular events (including stroke), changes in quality of life, and mood. Discussion The results of the motivational interviewing in stroke trial will add to our understanding of whether motivational interviewing may be potentially beneficial in the management of stroke and other diseases where similar lifestyle factors or medication adherence are relevant.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherWileyen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Stroke
dc.relation.urihttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ijs.12107/abstracten_NZ
dc.rights© 2013 The Authors.
dc.subjectadherenceen_NZ
dc.subjectmotivational interviewingen_NZ
dc.subjectrecurrent strokeen_NZ
dc.subjectsecondary preventionen_NZ
dc.titleReducing recurrent stroke: Methodology of the motivational interviewing in stroke (MIST) randomized clinical trialen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ijs.12107en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfInternational Journal of Strokeen_NZ
pubs.begin-page133en_NZ
pubs.elements-id38957
pubs.end-page139en_NZ
pubs.issue1en_NZ
pubs.volume9en_NZ


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