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dc.contributor.authorGreasley, David
dc.contributor.authorMadsen, Jakob B.
dc.contributor.authorOxley, Les
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-12T03:51:36Z
dc.date.available2013-11-12T03:51:36Z
dc.date.copyright2001-04
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.citationGreasley, D., Madsen, J. B., & Oxley, L. (2001). Income Uncertainty and Consumer Spending during the Great Depression. Explorations in Economic History, 38(2), 225-251.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/8166
dc.description.abstractRomer's (1990) influential hypothesis argues that uncertainty associated with the stock market crash in October 1929 caused a collapse in durable goods spending in 1930. On the basis of alternative indicators of uncertainty, new measures of expenditures, and two models of consumption, we contend that income uncertainty also reduced nondurable spending and had powerful detrimental effects beyond 1930. Income uncertainty peaked in the year following the gold standard crisis of September 1931 and contributed substantially to the more severe durable and nondurable spending declines of 1932.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherElsevieren_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofExplorations in Economic History
dc.relation.urihttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0014498300907514#en_NZ
dc.titleIncome uncertainty and consumer spending during the great depressionen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1006/exeh.2000.0751en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfExplorations in Economic Historyen_NZ
pubs.begin-page225en_NZ
pubs.elements-id42038
pubs.end-page251en_NZ
pubs.issue2en_NZ
pubs.volume38en_NZ


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