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dc.contributor.authorVenter, Elmar Retief
dc.contributor.authorde Villiers, Charl
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-09T22:56:33Z
dc.date.available2014-01-09T22:56:33Z
dc.date.copyright2013
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationVenter, E. R., & de Villiers, C. (2013). The accounting profession's influence on academe: South African evidence. Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, 26(8), 1246-1278.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/8383
dc.description.abstractPurpose – This paper aims to examine the influence of academics who are members of the profession on academic institutions. Design/methodology/approach – An analytic autoethnography of the influence of accounting academics who are members of the profession on South African universities, supported by publicly available information, such as policy and other documents, web sites, and published material; documentation the authors are able to gather as participants; and formal and informal interviews the authors conduct with academic managers. Findings – The paper finds that profession-identifying academics create and maintain rules and structures within academe, rules and structures that suit the profession. Managers who are members of the profession identify more closely with the profession than with their university. The analysis reveals the mechanics of this influence, as well as the consequences. Originality/value – The paper contributes to theory by synthesizing the creation of profession-inspired institutions framework and the maintenance of an institutions framework into a single framework. It also applies the theory by providing an example of a profession creating and maintaining institutionalization in an adjacent institution. The findings have implications for academia in cases where academic staff members are members of professional bodies, such as engineering and law faculties. The insights highlighted here may also be of interest to Australasian, UK and US accounting academics, because the literature contains evidence of pressures from professional bodies there.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limiteden_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofAccounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal
dc.relation.urihttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=17097955en_NZ
dc.subjectaccounting professionen_NZ
dc.subjectautoethnographyen_NZ
dc.subjectcase studyen_NZ
dc.subjectinstitutional theoryen_NZ
dc.titleThe accounting profession's influence on academe: South African evidenceen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/AAAJ-06-2012-01027en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfAccounting, Auditing and Accountability Journalen_NZ
pubs.begin-page1246en_NZ
pubs.elements-id38952
pubs.end-page1278en_NZ
pubs.issue8en_NZ
pubs.volume26en_NZ


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