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dc.contributor.authorBroughton, Paul L.
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-11T20:40:44Z
dc.date.available2015-02-11T20:40:44Z
dc.date.issued1971
dc.identifier.citationBroughton, P.L. (1971). Origin and distribution of mineral species in limestone caves. Earth Science Journal, 5(1), 36-43.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/9177
dc.description.abstractMore than 80 mineral species are known to result from secondary chemical reactions in solutional limestone caverns. These minerals are transitional and end-products of carbonate wall rock interactions with ground water and organic residue. Bacteria are often critical in fixing various ions in these reactions. Ultimate source of metallic ions is usually the sulphide minerals weathering in overlying strata, and brought to the cave environment by circulating ground waters. Hydrothermal solutions may bring heavy metallic ion concentrations from deeper strata. About one-third of the known cave mineral species occur in stalactitic form.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherWaikato Geological Society, The University of Waikatoen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEarth Science Journalen_NZ
dc.rights© 1971 Waikato Geological Society, The University of Waikato. All items in Research Commons are provided only to permit fair dealing for the purposes of research or private study. They are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.en_NZ
dc.titleOrigin and distribution of mineral species in limestone cavesen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ


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