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dc.contributor.authorLowe, David J.
dc.contributor.authorGreen, John D.
dc.contributor.editorSoons, J.M.
dc.contributor.editorSelby, Michael J.
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-14T23:18:45Z
dc.date.available1992-01-01
dc.date.available2015-04-14T23:18:45Z
dc.date.issued1992-01-01
dc.identifier5
dc.identifier.citationLowe, D. J., & Green, J. D. (1992). Lakes. In J. M. Soons & M. J. Selby (Eds.), Landforms of New Zealand: Second Edition (2nd ed.)(pp. 107-143). Auckland, New Zealand: Longman Paul.en
dc.identifier.isbn0-582-85929-8
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/9270
dc.description.abstractLakes have always held an aesthetic fascination for people; they figure prominently in both art and literature and have even been endowed with spiritual qualities. For example, the nineteenth century American writer Henry D. Thoreau (1854) considered a lake to be 'the landscape's most beautiful and expressive feature. It is the earth's eye; looking into which the beholder measures the depth of his own nature'. More prosaically, lakes are also of considerable geomorphological interest as dynamic landfonns originating in varied and often complex ways.
dc.format.extent23
dc.format.extent107 - 143 (37)
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherLongman Paul
dc.rights© 1992 copyright with the authors. Used with permission.
dc.titleLakes
dc.typeChapter in Book
dc.relation.isPartOfLandforms of New Zealand: Second Edition
pubs.begin-page107en_NZ
pubs.edition2
pubs.elements-id115368
pubs.end-page143en_NZ
pubs.place-of-publicationAuckland, New Zealand
pubs.publication-statusPublished
uow.identifier.chapter-no5en_NZ


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