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dc.contributor.authorVelayudhan, Prajusha Veethampulli
dc.contributor.authorMucalo, Michael R.
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-04T04:49:46Z
dc.date.available2014-01
dc.date.available2015-05-04T04:49:46Z
dc.date.issued2014-01
dc.identifier.citationVelayudhan, P. V., & Mucalo, M. R. (2014). A cursory study of the bulk and glaze composition plus metal leaching properties of a selection of antique, vintage and present day food and drink ceramic wares using XRF, FTIR, ²⁷Al, ²⁹Si, ³¹P MAS NMR and ICP-MS for providing a characterisation of the types of domestic ceramic ware used in New Zealand currently. Chemistry in New Zealand, January, 11–28.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/9313
dc.description.abstractThe ceramic utensils used for eating and drinking such as plates, cups, bowls and other items have been a fundamental part of many societies since ancient times. The word “ceramics” is itself derived from the Greek word κεραμικός (“Keramikos”)¹ meaning “of or for pottery”. The art of making ceramics dates back thousands of years with evidence of pottery from 20,000 years ago² being reported recently from Xianrendong Cave in China. Ceramics manufacture depends on a source of various materials, namely clay, e.g. kaolinite, silica and feldspar.³ When these clay and mineral materials are mixed and soaked in water with removal of the excess water, a wet clay is produced which can then be fashioned into the desired shapes using moulds. Water is then removed via drying and the articles fired at temperatures up to 1170 °C during which complex chemical transformations occur in the clay with physical changes in the added silica and feldspar. Kaolinite (Al₂Si₂O₅(OH)₄ ) is converted via a series of precursor compounds to mullite (Al₆Si₂O₁₃) and cristobalite (SiO₂). The feldspar acts as a flux with the alkali metal ion content (Na₂O, K₂O and CaO) causing a lowering of the melting point of the silica early on in the firing process. This melt effectively forms a glass which then draws the individual particles of the fired mixture together and additionally reacts with them so giving the ceramic body strength (when it cools) and reducing porosity.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherN.Z.Institute of Chemistry
dc.rightsThis article has been published in the journal: Chemistry in New Zealand. Used with permission.
dc.titleA cursory study of the bulk and glaze composition plus metal leaching properties of a selection of antique, vintage and present day food and drink ceramic wares using XRF, FTIR, ²⁷Al, ²⁹Si, ³¹P MAS NMR and ICP-MS for providing a characterisation of the types of domestic ceramic ware used in New Zealand currently
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.relation.isPartOfChemistry in New Zealand
pubs.begin-page11
pubs.elements-id82333
pubs.end-page28
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.volumeJanuary


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