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dc.contributor.authorBerryman, Mereen_NZ
dc.contributor.editorBevan-Brown, Jillen_NZ
dc.contributor.editorBerryman, Mereen_NZ
dc.contributor.editorHickey, Huhanaen_NZ
dc.contributor.editorMacfarlane, Sonjaen_NZ
dc.contributor.editorSmiler, Kirstenen_NZ
dc.contributor.editorWalker, Taien_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-07T04:12:52Z
dc.date.available2015en_NZ
dc.date.available2015-07-07T04:12:52Z
dc.date.issued2015en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationBerryman, M. (2015). Akoranga whakarei: Learning about inclusion from four kura rumaki. In J. Bevan-Brown, M. Berryman, H. Hickey, S. Macfarlane, K. Smiler, & T. Walker (Eds.), Working with Māori Children with Special Education Needs. He mahi whatahirahira (pp. 52–69). Wellington, New Zealand: NZCER Press.en
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-927231-43-2en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/9446
dc.description.abstractIn 2004 the New Zealand Ministry of Education proposed two research projects to understand how learning, social and cultural outcomes were being promoted for tamariki and rangatahi Māori with special educational needs in both kura auraki (English-medium schools) and kura rumaki (Māori-medium schools). 1hey also wanted to understand how this played out for other whānau members. At the time, a description of the services being promoted for Māori with special education needs acknowledged the philosophy that "tamariki and rangatahi with special needs and their whānau learn effectively through the provision of culturally competent services, which will ensure mana and tikanga are upheld" (Ministry of Education, 2003, p. 56). This chapter will briefly describe how this research was undertaken in kura rumaki and then discuss the findings that emerged. Perhaps not surprisingly, it will show that the staff from the kura who participated in this study, as with all of their students and whānau, had a very holistic and inclusive view of educating all tamariki and rangatahi, especially those with identified special education needs. The conclusion will consider some of the implications of these findings for others and propose that these research outcomes maintain relevance in 2014, a decade later.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNZCER Pressen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.nzcer.org.nz/nzcerpress/working-m-ori-children-special-education-needs
dc.rights© 2015 the authors.
dc.subjectSpecial educationen_NZ
dc.titleAkoranga whakarei: Learning about inclusion from four kura rumakien_NZ
dc.typeChapter in Book
dc.relation.isPartOfWorking with Māori Children with Special Education Needs. He mahi whatahirahiraen_NZ
pubs.begin-page52
pubs.elements-id120699
pubs.end-page69
pubs.place-of-publicationWellington, New Zealanden_NZ


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