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dc.contributor.advisorO’Driscoll, Michael P.
dc.contributor.advisorRoche, Maree A.
dc.contributor.authorHayman, Michelle
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T00:08:19Z
dc.date.available2015-08-03T00:08:19Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationHayman, M. (2015). Gender and gender minority differences in workplace bullying within New Zealand organisations (Thesis, Master of Applied Psychology (MAppPsy)). University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/9502en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/9502
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the present study was to identify the relationship between gender, gender minority status and workplace bullying within organisations across New Zealand. The relationship between workplace bullying and workplace outcomes (intention to quit, well-being, psychological strain and physical health) was also assessed. In addition, gender minority was explored as a moderator to determine the impact on the relationship between workplace bullying and workplace outcomes. Participants were recruited from a participant pool volunteering their time with research software company, Qualtrics. The sample consisted of 2,424 respondents from five different industries (sales, education, healthcare, industrial and services) within New Zealand. Results demonstrated that gender is important in understanding workplace bullying, however being part of a gender minority did not have the same effect. Females working in a male dominated organisation reported significantly higher levels of workplace bullying but not vice versa. In addition, in line with previous research, workplace bullying had a direct relationship with workplace outcomes (intention to leave, psychological strain, physical health and well-being). Although this research determined only a partial relationship between gender minority status and workplace bullying, the research has provided critical information to researchers, practitioners and human resource managers in New Zealand for the understanding of workplace bullying as a gendered phenomenon. Further research regarding sociological minorities rather than numerical minorities is recommended in order to gain a further understanding of the influence ‘power’ has on workplace bullying.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Waikato
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectWorkplace bullying
dc.subjectGender
dc.titleGender and gender minority differences in workplace bullying within New Zealand organisations
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Waikato
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Psychology (MAppPsy)
dc.date.updated2015-05-14T00:05:37Z
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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