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dc.contributor.authorChevalier-Watts, Julieten_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-21T22:08:23Z
dc.date.available2011en_NZ
dc.date.available2015-10-21T22:08:23Z
dc.date.issued2011en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationChevalier-Watts, J. (2011). Military operations and the right to life: the uneasy bedfellows. Human Rights and International Legal Discourse, 5(2), 207–232.en
dc.identifier.issn1783-7014en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/9689
dc.description.abstractThis article explores the challenges facing the European Court of Human Rights in relation to a High Contracting Party's right to deploy the military as a resull of insurgent or terrorist activity, and the obligations under Article 2 of the European Convention on Human Rights (the Convention), concerning the right to life, that were imposed on High Contracting Parties as a result of ratifying the Convention. In considering these challenges, this article addresses firstly the ground-breaking case of McCann and Others v United Kingdom, and then focuses on the jurisprudence arising out of right to life cases brought against firstly Turkey and then Russia as a result of military operations, which have been heavily influenced by the case of McCann.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherIntersentiaen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.hrild.org/
dc.rights© 2011 Intersentia. Used with permission.
dc.titleMilitary operations and the right to life: the uneasy bedfellowsen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.relation.isPartOfHuman Rights and International Legal Discourseen_NZ
pubs.begin-page207
pubs.elements-id37421
pubs.end-page232
pubs.issue2en_NZ
pubs.volume5en_NZ


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