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dc.contributor.authorChevalier-Watts, Julieten_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-28T20:21:59Z
dc.date.available2011en_NZ
dc.date.available2015-10-28T20:21:59Z
dc.date.issued2011en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationChevalier-Watts, J. (2011). Freemasonry and charity. New Zealand Law Journal, March, 50–53.en
dc.identifier.issn0028-8373en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/9699
dc.description.abstractAlthough the exact origins of Freemasonry are long since lost, its history can be traced back to as early as the Middle Ages and to highly skilled stonemasons who formed themselves into lodges to protect their skills and secrets and to pass on this valuable knowledge onto selected apprentices. Freemasonry is considered to be one of the world’s largest and oldest fraternal organisations, whose principles of integrity, goodwill and charity form the foundation for an individual’s way of living. Freemasonry is renowned for its key support of charitable activities and community services. Freemasonry in New Zealand is divided into three Masonic Divisions, each of which is divided in to a number of Districts, and each District has a number of Lodges. The Grand Lodge of New Zealand, based in Wellington, oversees all of these.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherLexisNexis NZ Limiteden_NZ
dc.rightsThis is the submitted version of an article published in the journal: New Zealand Law Journal. ©2011 LexisNexis NZ Ltd. Used with permission.
dc.titleFreemasonry and charityen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.relation.isPartOfNew Zealand Law Journalen_NZ
pubs.begin-page50
pubs.elements-id36022
pubs.end-page53
pubs.volumeMarchen_NZ


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