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dc.contributor.authorMiddleton, Sue
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-23T04:19:04Z
dc.date.available2008-09-23T04:19:04Z
dc.date.issued2007-12
dc.identifier.citationMiddleton, S. (2007). Mentoring and teaching in academic settings: Professional and cultural identities from one Pākehā’s perspective. MAI Review, 3. Peer commentary 2.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/979
dc.description.abstractWhen invited to respond to the paper on “Mentoring Māori in a Pākehā framework” by Hook, Waaka and Raumati (2007), I hesitated. Mentoring was not a term I had previously used in my professional thinking or academic writing: unlike Barbara Grant (Ratima & Grant, 2007), I had not been involved in formal mentoring programmes or immersed myself in the mentoring literature. As a Pākehā, I was not qualified to evaluate the authors’ definition of a Māori framework. At first glance, the target paper’s focus seemed to be on mentoring in commercial, rather than academic workplaces. My experience had been as a teacher, the last 30 years having been in a university School of Education. I was persuaded to undertake this commentary on the grounds that academic work involves nurturing, advising and supporting younger or less experienced colleagues, as well as students – tasks identified as mentoring in the Hook et al. paper. The following comments are informed by my everyday practices as teacher, thesis supervisor and researcher, and by my former management roles as an assistant dean of graduate studies and head of department. My angle of vision and conceptual resources are those of a (Pākehā and feminist) sociologist of education.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNga Pae o te Maramatangaen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://ojs.review.mai.ac.nz/index.php/MR/article/view/76/86en_US
dc.rightsThis article has been published in the journal: MAI Review. Used with Permission.
dc.subjectbiculturalismen_US
dc.subjectcross-cultural mentoringen_US
dc.subjectMāori mentoringen_US
dc.titleMentoring and teaching in academic settings: Professional and cultural identities from one Pākehā’s perspectiveen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.relation.isPartOfMAI Reviewen_NZ
pubs.begin-page1en_NZ
pubs.elements-id32776
pubs.end-page6en_NZ
pubs.issue2en_NZ
pubs.volume3en_NZ


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