Show simple item record  

dc.contributor.authorTurney, Chris S.M.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorPalmer, Jonathan G.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHogg, Alan G.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorFogwill, Christopher J.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorJones, Richarden_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBronk Ramsey, Christopheren_NZ
dc.contributor.authorFenwick, Pavlaen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorGrierson, Paulineen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWilmshurst, Janeten_NZ
dc.contributor.authorO'Donnell, Alisonen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Zoëen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLipson, Mathewen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-15T03:31:06Z
dc.date.available2016en_NZ
dc.date.available2016-02-15T03:31:06Z
dc.date.issued2016en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationTurney, C. S. M., Palmer, J. G., Hogg, A. G., Fogwill, C. J., Jones, R., Bronk Ramsey, C., … Lipson, M. (2016). Multi-decadal variations in Southern Hemisphere atmospheric ¹⁴C: Evidence against a Southern Ocean sink at the end of the Little Ice Age CO₂ anomaly. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, online. http://doi.org/10.1002/2015GB005257en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/9905
dc.description.abstractNorthern Hemisphere-wide cooling during the Little Ice Age (LIA; CE 1650-1775) is associated with a ~5 ppmv decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide. Changes in terrestrial and ocean carbon reservoirs have been postulated as possible drivers of this relatively large shift in atmospheric CO₂, potentially providing insights into the mechanisms and sensitivity of the global carbon cycle. Here we report decadally-resolved radiocarbon (¹⁴C) levels in a network of tree rings series spanning CE 1700-1950 located along the northern boundary of, and within, the Southern Ocean. We observe regional dilutions in atmospheric radiocarbon (relative to the Northern Hemisphere) associated with upwelling of ¹⁴CO₂–depleted abyssal waters. We find the inter-hemispheric ¹⁴C offset approaches zero during increasing global atmospheric CO₂ at the end of the LIA, with reduced ventilation in the Southern Ocean and a Northern Hemisphere source of old carbon (most probably originating from deep Arctic peat layers). The coincidence of the atmospheric CO₂ increase and reduction in the inter-hemispheric ¹⁴C offset imply a common climate control. Possible mechanisms of synchronous change in the high latitudes of both hemispheres are discussed.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Unionen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015GB005257/abstracten_NZ
dc.rightsThis is an author’s accepted version of an article published in the journal: Global Biogeochemical Cycles. ©2016 American Geophysical Union.
dc.titleMulti-decadal variations in Southern Hemisphere atmospheric ¹⁴C: Evidence against a Southern Ocean sink at the end of the Little Ice Age CO₂ anomaly.en_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2015GB005257en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfGlobal Biogeochemical Cyclesen_NZ
pubs.begin-page211en_NZ
pubs.elements-id136875
pubs.end-page218en_NZ
pubs.issue2en_NZ
pubs.volumeonlineen_NZ


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record