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Fish powder as a low-cost component in media for producing bacterial cellulose

Abstract
Some bacteria can produce extracellular bacterial cellulose (BC). This polysaccharide is chemically identical to cellulose produced by plants but has no associated lignin and hemicelluloses. The unique mechanical properties, chemical stability and purity allow BC to be exploited for a range of biomedical applications. However, medium costs limit commercial BC production. The suitability of using fish powder as a low-cost media component for producing BC by submerged culture of Gluconacetobacter xylinus in shake flasks was investigated. Fish powder was made by drying and grinding Koi carp (Cyprinus carpio), a pest fish in New Zealand waterways. Fermentations were done at 30oC in a growth medium containing 50 g/L glucose, the required minerals, and either 5 g/L yeast extract or 15 g/L fish powder, The BC yield on both yeast extract and fish powder was 0.04 g/g glucose, demonstrating fish powder was a suitable low cost ingredient for supplying nitrogen and amino acids in the media.
Type
Conference Contribution
Type of thesis
Series
Citation
Adnan, A., Nair, G. R., Lay, M. C. & Swan, J. E. (2012). Fish powder as a low-cost component in media for producing bacterial cellulose. In Proceedings of Chemeca 2012: Quality of life through chemical engineering: 23-26 September 2012, Wellington, New Zealand.
Date
2012
Publisher
Degree
Supervisors
Rights
This article has been published in the proceedings of Chemeca 2012: Quality of life through chemical engineering. Used with permission.