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Carbon-fixation rates and associated microbial communities residing in arid and ephemerally wet Antarctic Dry Valley soils

Abstract
Carbon-fixation is a critical process in severely oligotrophic Antarctic Dry Valley (DV) soils and may represent the major source of carbon in these arid environments. However, rates of C-fixation in DVs are currently unknown and the microorganisms responsible for these activities unidentified. In this study, C-fixation rates measured in the bulk arid soils (<5% moisture) ranged from below detection limits to ∼12 nmol C/cc/h. Rates in ephemerally wet soils ranged from ∼20 to 750 nmol C/cc/h, equating to turnover rates of ∼7–140 days, with lower rates in stream-associated soils as compared to lake-associated soils. Sequencing of the large subunit of RuBisCO (cbbL) in these soils identified green-type sequences dominated by the 1B cyanobacterial phylotype in both arid and wet soils including the RNA fraction of the wet soil. Red-type cbbL genes were dominated by 1C actinobacterial phylotypes in arid soils, with wetted soils containing nearly equal proportions of 1C (actinobacterial and proteobacterial signatures) and 1D (algal) phylotypes. Complementary 16S rRNA and 18S rRNA gene sequencing also revealed distinct differences in community structure between biotopes. This study is the first of its kind to examine C-fixation rates in DV soils and the microorganisms potentially responsible for these activities.
Type
Journal Article
Type of thesis
Series
Citation
Niederberger, T. D., Sohm, J. A., Gunderson, T., Tirindelli, J., Capone, D. G., Carpenter, E. J., & Cary, S. C. (2015). Carbon-fixation rates and associated microbial communities residing in arid and ephemerally wet Antarctic Dry Valley soils. Frontiers in Microbiology. http://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2015.01347
Date
2015
Publisher
Frontiers
Degree
Supervisors
Rights
© 2015 Niederberger, Sohm, Gunderson, Tirindelli, Capone, Carpenter and Cary. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.