Item

Delayed pasture germination allows improved rigid ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) control through grazing and broad-spectrum herbicide application

Abstract
Eastern star clover (Trifolium dasyurum C. Presl.) is a new pasture legume developed for use in short phases between extended cropping sequences in Western Australian dryland agriculture. Its delayed germination provides an opportunity to obtain almost complete control of the highly-competitive crop weed rigid ryegrass (Lolium rigidum Gaudin) through non-selective herbicide application and/or grazing. Given the recent development of a commercial cultivar of eastern star clover (cv. AGWEST® Sothis), a complex simulation model is used to evaluate its potential profitability relative to continuous-cropping and rotations employing a popular pasture, French serradella (Ornithopus sativus Brot. cv. Cadiz). The profitability of those sequences containing eastern star clover is robust to high initial ryegrass populations and increasing severity of herbicide resistance. Moreover, the weed control benefits accruing to this pasture's delayed germination are of sufficient magnitude to offset the low establishment cost and higher biomass production of French serradella. This highlights the value of eastern star clover to producers in the Western Australian wheatbelt and offers an additional trait that plant breeders and selectors can exploit when seeking to expand weed control options in land-use sequences.
Type
Journal Article
Type of thesis
Series
Citation
Doole, G. J. & Revell, C. K. (2010). Delayed pasture germination allows improved rigid ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) control through grazing and broad-spectrum herbicide application. Crop Protection, 29(2), 153-162.
Date
2010
Publisher
Elsevier
Degree
Supervisors
Rights