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Instabilities of the cortex during natural sleep

Abstract
The electrical signals generated by the human cortex during sleep have been widely studied over the last 50 years. The electroencephalogram (EEG) observed during natural sleep exhibits structures with frequencies from 0.5 Hz to over 50 Hz and complicated waveforms such as spindles and K-complexes. Understanding has been enhanced by comprehensive intra-cellular measurements from the cortex and thalamus such as those performed by Steriade et al [1] and Sanchez-Vives and McCormick [2]. Models of the cerebal cortex have been developed in order to explain many of the features observed. These can be classified in terms of individual neuron models or collective models. Since we wish to compare predictions with gross features of the human EEG, we choose a collective model, where we average over a population of neurons in macrocolumns. A number of models of this form have been developed recently; that developed at Waikato draws from a number of different sources to describe the temporal and spatial dynamics of the system.
Type
Conference Contribution
Type of thesis
Series
Citation
Wilson, M. T., Steyn-Ross, M. L., Steyn-Ross, D. A. & Sleigh, J. W. (2005). Instabilities of the cortex during natural sleep. In Proceedings of the 16th National Congress Australian Institute of Physics. Australian Institute of Physics, Canberra, Australia, 31 January-4 February, 2005.
Date
2005
Publisher
Degree
Supervisors
Rights
This article has been published in the Proceedings of the 16th National Congress Australian Institute of Physics.